Natural Sciences

Classes

BIOS110 : General Biology

This course is designed to give students an overview of the major principles of Biology at both the molecular and organismal level. In addition to the basics of cell and molecular biology as well as the major macromolecules necessary for life, topics covered will include the diversity of living organisms, major differences among phylogenetic groups, evolution, and ecology.

Credits

4

BIOS120 : Cell Biology

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the structure and function of the cell. Topics will include the organization of the eukaryotic cell into organelles, metabolism of the major macromolecules in the cell, the central dogma of molecular biology, cell motility and division, as well as signal transduction.

Credits

4

BIOS150 : Scientific Literacy

This survey course explores fundamental scientific concepts necessary to function in a modern industrial society. Students will discuss historic and recent scientific theories and develop skills necessary to become a critical consumer of scientific information.

Credits

1

BIOS203 : Anatomy & Physiology I

This course is to provide the information about the normal structure and functioning of the human body. Major topics covered include cell biology and chemistry, body tissues, the integumentary system, skeleton, joints, muscles, and the nervous system.

Credits

4

BIOS204 : Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is provides information about the normal structure and function of the human body. Major topics covered include the endocrine system; cardiovascular system; lymphatic and immune system; respiratory system; digestive system and metabolism; urinary system; fluid, electrolyte, and acid/base balance; reproductive system; and human development and inheritance.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy & Physiology I.

BIOS205 : Microbiology

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the biology of microorganisms including viruses, bacteria, protozoans, fungi, algae and helminths. The course will also discuss the interaction of microorganisms with the human body including the human immune system.  Finally the course will briefly discuss diseases affecting different parts of the human body. The laboratory will include the study of the elementary principles and methods of bacteriology and other microorganisms and their relationship to health and disease. Basic concepts of control and prevention of disease are introduced including transmission, incubation, growth and control. The laboratory will not always correspond with the lecture topics as it focuses primarily on the growth, identification and control of bacteria.

Credits

4

BIOS221 : Pathophysiology

Basic concepts of pathophysiology are introduced beginning with a major focus on cellular functions and pathology. These concepts serve as the foundation for the course as pathological changes and their manifestations, including inflammation, in major body systems are examined. Alterations in body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, acid-base balance, digestive, urinary, respiratory, cardiac, endocrine, neurological and musculoskeletal functions are emphasized.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOS204 Anatomy & Physiology II; OR BIOS234 Human Anatomy and BIOS235 Human Physiology.

BIOS234 : Human Anatomy

 Human Anatomy is a study of the structure of the human body with an emphasis on clinical relevance and applications. The course will study human gross anatomy using a regional approach, including, the thorax, abdomen, pelvis and perineum, back, lower limb, upper limb, head and neck.

Credits

4

BIOS235 : Human Physiology

This course examines the basic function of the human body. Introduction to neural and hormonal homeostatic control mechanisms, as well as the study of the musculoskelatal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, immune, reproductive, and endocrine organ systems.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIOS110 General Biology or BIOS120 Cell Biology.

BIOS301 : Computer Simulations in Biomedical Sciences

An introduction to computer simulation of dynamic biomedical systems modeling that will include theoretical studies and hands-on modeling experience. It will familiarize students with systems analysis and modeling with applications and case studies drawn primarily from human physiology, microbiology, and pharmacology. Students will learn how to formulate, build, and analyze models.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOS204 Anatomy and Physiology II OR BIOS234 Anatomy and BIOS235 Physiology.

BIOS302 : Bioinformatics

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of bioinformatics and genomics. An examination of the genomic organization of viral, bacterial, plant, animal, and human organisms will be performed. The central role of bioinformatics in managing and mining the vast amounts of biological information generated from the genome projects will be emphasized. This course will provide foundation for system biology and pathology informatics.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOS204 Anatomy and Physiology II OR BIOS234 Anatomy and BIOS235 Physiology; BIOS120 Cell Biology or CHEM 103 Principles of Chemistry.

BIOS303 : Introduction to Epidemiology

This course introduces basic epidemiologic principles including surveillance, study design and critical analysis of data. Critical thinking skills are developed in understanding disease transmission, prevention, causality including environmental and genetic factors, and measurement of risk. Topics to be discussed include historical perspectives of epidemiologic measures of disease occurrence and of association, clinical epidemiology, disease screening and study design.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS205 Microbiology; STAT210 Elements of Statistics.

BIOS304 : Immunology

An introduction of concepts in immunology and their role and importance in various human diseases. Topics that may be included, but not limited to, are development of the immune system, structure and function of cellular and humoral components, immune responses to infections, vaccine development, tumors, autoimmune disorders, allergies, and immune deficiencies and AIDS.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOS204 Anatomy and Physiology II OR BIOS234 Anatomy and BIOS235 Physiology; or BIOS110 General Biology and BIOS120 Cell Biology.

BIOS305 : Virology

This course is an overview of virology as it applies to human health and disease. A broad discussion of the molecular mechanisms of viral pathology will be provided. Viral evolution and dynamics of infection in the presence of a host immune response will be explored. Further, insight will be given as to how viruses are able to maintain themselves in reservoir species and cause outbreaks in the human population.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS120 Cell Biology.

BIOS310 : Genetics

This course offers an overview of the principles of genetics including Mendelian and modern concepts of heredity. In this course inheritance will be examined in terms of classical or transmission genetics and also at the molecular level through the study of structure, function and expression of the DNA molecules themselves in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Developments in molecular genetics will be addressed through the chemistry and physiology of the gene and the nature of gene action. Students will develop critical thinking skills in the application of current genetic knowledge and laboratory techniques.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOS204 Anatomy and Physiology II OR BIOS234 Anatomy and BIOS235 Physiology; and BIOS120 Cell Biology.

BIOS312 : Embryology

This course provides students the essentials of embryological development of the human. Topics covered include reproduction, fertilization, development of the embryo, the fetal period, organogenesis, birth defects, and the cellular and molecular basis of development.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOS204 Anatomy & Physiology II, OR BIOS234 Human Anatomy and BIOS235 Human Physiology.

BIOS315 : Human Infectious Diseases

The course examines the infectious cycle, diagnosis, and treatment of various medically important microorganisms. A survey of the immune system and how microorganisms subvert this defense system will also be addressed.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS205 Microbiology

BIOS318 : Cross-Sectional Anatomy

Cross-sectional Anatomy is an advanced anatomy and physiology course that discusses anatomical structures of the body located in an array of multiple imaging planes. Characteristic appearances of anatomical structures will be discussed as they apply to Computer Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Ultrasound. Pathophysiological aspects of major anatomical structures will be addressed and reviewed through identification exercises and assignments when applicable.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS203 Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOS204 Anatomy & Physiology II OR BIOS234 Human Anatomy and BIOS235 Human Physiology.

BIOS320 : Biochemistry

This course deals with the structure and function of biological macromolecules as well as the major metabolic pathways of the cell. Special emphasis will be placed on protein chemistry as it relates to enzyme kinetics. The energetics and regulation of the major routes of metabolism in the cell will be discussed.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIOS120 Cell Biology; CHEM220 Organic Chemistry II.

BIOS330 : Scientific Research Methodology

This course will build on basic concepts of pathophysiology.  In-depth examination of disease processes in primary body systems will provide the student with a greater understanding of the mechanism of disease.  The effect of the disease process across multiple body systems will also be examined.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS150 Scientific Literacy; and 12 credits in the Biomedical Sciences.

Corequisites

STAT210 Elements of Statistics

BIOS331 : Advanced Pathophysiology

This course will build on basic concepts of pathophysiology.  In-depth examination of disease processes in primary body systems will provide the student with a greater understanding of the mechanism of disease.  The effect of the disease process across multiple body systems will also be examined.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS221 Pathophysiology.

BIOS410 : Molecular Biology

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to modern concepts of molecular biology. Topics will include the structure and function of nucleic acids, molecular mechanisms of signal transduction, gene expression and regulation, and applications of molecular biology in biotechnology and biomedical research. Students will also gain experience with current molecular biology laboratory techniques.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIOS320 Biochemistry.

BIOS445 : Field Research Experience

This course is an independent research project conducted by the student. Students will formulate a research question, gather background information from published sources, design experiments, and collect data. Students will learn to critically evaluate, process and analyze collected data. The course will also focus on correct interpretation of results and their presentation in written and oral forms.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIOS330 Scientific Research Methodology.

BIOS480 : Senior Capstone

This is a senior level course designed to synthesize the knowledge gained throughout the Biomedical Sciences curriculum with the experience in the Field Research Experiences. This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to apply the knowledge of scientific theoretical foundations with a biomedical application into a student-directed, faculty facilitated scholarly project. The student will work with an assigned faculty or preceptor to continue literature review and data compilation from the Field Research Experiences utilizing independent inquiry, creativity and analytical techniques culminating into a project suitable for presentation and/or publication.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

BIOS330 Scientific Research Methodology; senior status.

Corequisites

BIOS445 Field Research Experience.

CHEM103 : Principles of Chemistry

This course introduces chemical concepts from an inorganic, organic, and biological perspective, including the structure and physical properties of matter, chemical nomenclature, chemical bonding, and chemical reactions. Particular emphasis will be placed on concepts related to health, including functional groups, solutions, acids, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Concepts introduced in lecture will be explored further through hands-on experience in the laboratory.

Credits

4

CHEM110 : General Chemistry I

General Chemistry I is the first in a two semester series designed to give students a fundamental understanding of chemistry. The basic principles of chemistry including states of matter, atomic structure, and atomic theory will be introduced, as well as ionic and covalent compounds and the basics of chemical reactions. When relevant, chemistry principles will be discussed from a biomedical perspective.

Credits

4

Corequisites

MATH105 Intermediate Algebra or placement in a higher math course.

CHEM120 : General Chemistry II

General Chemistry II is the second in a two-semester series designed to give students a fundamental understanding of chemistry. Solutions and concentration measurements as well as chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are discussed. Acid-Base chemistry, thermodynamics, and oxidation-reduction reactions will be studied. When relevant, chemistry principles will be discussed from a biomedical perspective.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHEM110 General Chemistry I.

CHEM204 : Principles of Organic Chemistry

This course provides a broad introduction to the basic principles, theories and applications of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics will include modern structural theory, organic nomenclature, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and an introduction to functional group chemistry. Also covers the interpretation of IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy for the structure determination of organic compounds. Includes lab experience.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHEM103 Principles of Chemistry or CHEM110 General Chemistry I; CHEM120 General Chemistry II.

CHEM210 : Organic Chemistry I

Topics of study are bonding principles, functional groups, isomerism, sterochemistry, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, and alkyl halides. This course will examine addition, elimination, rearrangement and substitution reactions and corresponding mechanisms.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHEM120 General Chemistry II.

CHEM220 : Organic Chemistry II

Nomenclature, properties, reactions involving aromatics, organometallics, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, and amines. Mechanisms include electrophilic aromatic substitution and nucleophilic addition. Students will be introduced to nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry used in analysis of organic compounds.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHEM210 Organic Chemistry I.

NUTR121 : Nutrition

Basic principles of human nutrition are introduced with emphasis on nutrients, food sources, and function of nutrients within the body. Nutritional requirements throughout the life span will be addressed as well as the impact of cultural, psychological, and personal health factors on an individual's nutritional status. Student will be exposed to methods to assess nutritional status and provide preventive and therapeutic dietary teaching.

Credits

3

PHYS105 : Descriptive Physics (with lab)

This course provides a conceptual view of physics including the areas of mechanics, matter, heat, sound, light, optics, electricity, magnetism, radioactivity, and nuclear energy.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MATH105 Intermediate Algebra.

PHYS210 : General Physics I (with lab)

A physics course to fulfill the requirements for various pre-professional programs, introduces linear and rotational mechanics including energy and momentum considerations, thermodynamics, and waves.  Includes discussion of the historical development of our understanding along with references to environmental and social impacts of applied technology. 

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MATH205 Calculus.

PHYS220 : General Physics II (with lab)

A continuation of PHYS210 covering electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics, special relativity and modern physics. Discussion of the historical development of our understanding along with references to environmental and social impacts of applied technology.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

PHYS210 General Physics I.